Stormbreaker

Stormbreaker

They told him his uncle died in an accident. He wasn’t wearing his seatbelt, they said. But when fourteen-year-old Alex finds his uncle’s windshield riddled with bullet holes, he knows it was no accident. What he doesn’t know yet is that his uncle was killed while on a top-secret mission. But he is about to, and once he does, there is no turning back. Finding himself in the middle of terrorists, Alex must outsmart the people who want him dead. The government has given him the technology, but only he can provide the courage. Should he fail, every child in England will be murdered in cold blood.

Alex has always had a bizarre fascination with death.  So when he’s told that Odd Uncle Harry has been killed in a car crash, he convinces his family to go to the funeral.

It’s closed casket.  But Alex’s parents start talking with the family, and decide to stay in town for a few days to help comfort Grandma Kelly.  He convinces his little brother Charlie to go exploring with him down by the ditch where the car crash occurred.

The family had been told that the car had been so badly burnt it was hauled away for scraps, but Alex notices two strips flattened grass leading away from the road, spaced just far enough apart to be car tires.  He goes to investigate.  Charlie is scared, asking to return to the road as they first cross the meadow, then enter a wood.  There, under a tarp they find Uncle Harry’s car.

It’s riddled with bullet holes.

Alex knows that something is wrong, and tells Charlie that they need to leave.  He hears noses in the trees, and begins to run.  Somehow, he looses hod of Charlie’s hand, and when he turns around he sees men in black carrying Charlie away.

Alex tries to follow the men, but he looses them in the woods, and returns home.  The police are called, who then make more phone calls.  Before he knows what is happening, Alex is in a car being rushed through the streets to an underground facility.  It’s there that he’s told that Uncle Harry was in fact a secret agent tracking a terrorist group.  He had died in the process.

That same group now had Charlie.  As Alex is being questioned about exactly what he saw, a monitor begins to beep, then a video pops to life.

A red-haired man introduces himself as Dr. Joy, the leader of the terrorist organization.  The camera pans to Charlie, tied to a chair.  Next to him is another man, that one of the agents around Alex identifies as an agent.  The man explains that the vial he is holding contains a poison deadly to children, while having no effect on adults.  To prove it, he fills a cup with the liquid, pouring half into the agent’s mouth, then the other half into Charlie’s.  Instantly, Charlie begins to spasm, before suddenly going limp.  He is dead.  The agent next to him looks on in horror, but exhibits none of the symptoms.

Dr. Joy calmly shoots the agent before turning the the camera and informing the agency they have one week to hand over $500,000,000 or they will release the drug into the drinking water.  Every child in England will die.

The agency knows that even if they give Dr. Joy the money, he will still have to power to release the poison at any time.

The agency decides that the only way to stop Dr. Joy is to train Alex to become a master spy, have him wander around the city they believe Dr. Joy’s secret lair to be.  Eventually Alex will be captured, where he will then be able to steal a vial of the poison, and destroy the facility.

So they train him well in three days, drop him off outside of an old abandoned factory, which turns out not to be abandoned when Alex is taken by some thugs to be “Tested”.  Once inside, just as predicted Alex manages to break out of his holding cell, steal a vial of poison, carefully place several explosives, then just as he’s about to be caught, sets them off and is airlifted away.

Dr. Joy is able to escape, making room for plenty of sequels as Alex returns to the agency to become their first ever child agent.

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